Thursday, 22 August 2013

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” is a comedy song written by Eric Idle that was initially featured in the 1979 film Monty Python's Life of Brian and has gone on to become a common singalong at open events such as football matches as well as funerals.

While striving to find a way of ending the film Monty Python’s Life of Brian, Eric Idle wrote a new version of the song which was sung in a more straight fashion, which the other Python members agreed would be better enough for the last part of the film. While practicing the song, during a break in filming, Idle discovered that the song worked well if sung in a cheekier manner. This new version was employed in the film and became one of Monty Python’s most eminent songs.

Thursday, 14 February 2013

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life

Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse.
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best...

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

If life seems jolly rotten
There's something you've forgotten
And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
When you're feeling in the dumps
Don't be silly chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle - that's the thing.

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

For life is quite absurd
And death's the final word
You must always face the curtain with a bow.
Forget about your sin - give the audience a grin
Enjoy it - it's your last chance anyhow.

So always look on the bright side of death
Just before you draw your terminal breath

Life's a piece of shit
When you look at it
Life's a laugh and death's a joke, it's true.
You'll see it's all a show
Keep 'em laughing as you go
Just remember that the last laugh is on you.

And always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the right side of life...
(Come on guys, cheer up!)
Always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the bright side of life...
(Worse things happen at sea, you know.)
Always look on the bright side of life...
(I mean - what have you got to lose?)
(You know, you come from nothing - you're going back to nothing.
What have you lost? Nothing!)
Always look on the right side of life...

Friday, 10 August 2012

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life

"Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" is a comedy song written by Eric Idle that was originally featured in the 1979 film Monty Python's Life of Brian and has gone on to become a common singalong at public events such as football matches as well as funerals.

Tuesday, 16 August 2011

Common Crossbill

The Common Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) is a small passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It breeds in the spruce forests of North America, where it is known as Red Crossbill, as well as Europe and Asia; some populations (different species?) breed in pine forests in certain areas of all three continents, and in North America, also in Douglas-fir. It nests in conifers, laying 3–5 eggs. This crossbill is mainly resident, but will regularly irrupt south if its food source fails. This species will form flocks outside the breeding season, often mixed with other crossbills. The crossbills are characterised by the mandibles crossing at their tips, which gives the group its English name. They are specialist feeders on conifer cones, particularly the various spruce species but also some populations (different species?) in Douglas-fir and various pine species, and the unusual bill shape is an adaptation to assist the extraction of the seeds from the cone. Adult males tend to be red or orange in colour, and females green or yellow, but there is much variation. This species is difficult to separate from Parrot Crossbill and Scottish Crossbill, both of which breed within its Eurasian range. The identification problem is less severe in North America, where only Red Crossbill and White-winged Crossbill occur. However, the South Hills Crossbill, occurring in the South Hills and Albion Mountains in Idaho, USA, has recently been described as a new species (Loxia sinesciuris). It is virtually identical to the Red Crossbill differing slightly in body dimensions and calls and shows a very low degree of hybridization with the Red Crossbill. Plumage distinctions from Parrot and Scottish Crossbills are negligible. The head and bill are smaller than in either of the other species. Care is needed to identify this species. The glip or chup call is probably the best indicator. Work on vocalisation in North America suggest that, in that continent alone, there are eight or nine populations of Red Crossbill with different calls, which rarely if ever interbreed. These forms also vary in terms of bill size and structure, and specialise on the seed cones of different species of conifer. Few ornithologists seem inclined to give these forms species status at present.